Best 60% keyboard for Gaming Reviews and guide

Contrary to conventional thinking, which holds that gamers like full-size boards with a tonne of macro keys, media controls, and other fascinating gadgets, compact keyboards are the mechanical keyboard market segment that is expanding the fastest. These 60% keyboards, in contrast, emphasize a simple style that is incredibly portable and requires little desk space. Based on our rigorous testing, we’ll reveal our picks for the best 60% keyboard available in this round-up.

For years, independent keyboard manufacturers have produced 60% of their keyboards for enthusiasts, but now larger brands, such as the Logitechs, Razers, and Corsairs of the world, are starting to participate.
This is a fantastic moment to hop on the micro keyboard bandwagon if you wanted to see what all the excitement was about with these smaller boards without giving up creature comforts like synchronized RGB illumination and well-developed software packages.


Naturally, smaller vendors have advantages as well, and we’ll attempt to cover both sides of the spectrum while still concentrating on widely available boards.

The Ducky One 2 Mini/Mecha Mini combines a tiny form factor with outstanding switch options and an amazingly smooth typing experience to create the greatest 60% gaming keyboard and our top overall gaming keyboard.

The 60% size is a little more specialized; only a few keyboards, in my opinion, are acceptable for recommendations. Our list of the 60% keyboards addresses the majority of use cases and personal preferences.

By hiding some essential keys, such as the arrow keys and function keys, beneath a function layer, 60% of layouts become usable. Check out our suggestions if you are already familiar and know you want a 60%.
Here is our opinion on whether 60% is the appropriate choice for you if you’re unsure.

How Many Keys Does a 60 Percent Keyboard Have?

104 keys make up a typical, full-size keyboard. Technically, a keyboard that is 60 percent full should have 62 keys, while a keyboard that is 65 percent full should have 67 or 68 keys. Realistically speaking, manufacturers fudge the figures and key-count totals a little. The majority of the ‘60% models we evaluated had between 60 and 65 keys, whilst ‘65% of models had between 66 and 70 keys.

The 60 percent or 65 percent keyboard layouts do away with what some users might consider necessary inputs, unlike the tenkeyless (TKL) keyboard layout that merely eliminates the number keypad. The Function (F1 to F12) keys, arrow keys, and other navigation and utility keys are removed from the standard 60 percent keyboard. (Think Page Up, Page Down, Home, Delete, and Print Screen.) There are no sections or gaps because the layout has been condensed into a single block.

For instance, the Escape key no longer floats by itself because that would take up additional space in the design.

While still being portable, 65 percent of keyboards allow you a little more wriggle room. The Function key and the majority of other unnecessary keys are removed from these boards, but the arrow keys are typically retained. Many people also hang onto one or two additional keys. You have the opportunity to remap the keyboard thanks to the additional, programmable macro keys that Fnatic and a few other keyboard manufacturers include.

Key Types: Understanding 60 Percent Mechanical Keyboards

Typing sensation is the most crucial factor, much like with the greatest keyboards and, more particularly, the best mechanical keyboards. Finding a keyboard that feels good depends on your preferred key-switch “flavor,” as I haven’t seen a non-mechanical 60% or 70% keyboard. (Key switches are the actuation elements located beneath the keycap.) The fundamentals of mechanical key switches are covered in our introduction.

It’s critical to remember why you prefer a keyboard with a 65 percent or lower slope. Many gaming keyboards use linear switches, also known as “Red” switches, which are easy to operate. Hair-trigger switches allow for incredibly fast gameplay, but they also increase the likelihood of mistaken and out-of-order key pushes.

You might want to search elsewhere if you’re looking for balance or simply the comfiest switches overall.
Your search results may introduce you to a variety of new keyboard producers, many of which are Asian, like Anne Pro, Ducky, Happy Hacking, and Leopold.

Should I Get a Wireless 60 Percent Keyboard?

A detachable cable, preferably USB-C, is included on between 60 and 65 percent of keyboards, making transportation and storage simpler. Companies occasionally still include proprietary locking mechanisms in the cables to prevent the cable from coming undone while being used.

I prefer it when businesses avoid using such tactics. Except in extreme cases, the cables stay in place just well on their own, and since there is no locking mechanism, any other USB Type-C to A cable can be used to replace a broken one.

What about portable wireless keyboards?

After all, you might as well cut the wire as well if your goal is to clear up desk space. Wireless 60 and 65 percent keyboards are available, but they are uncommon.
Competitive gamers, programmers, and fans of custom keyboards—the groups who have usually shown the greatest interest in 60 and 65 percent keyboards—haven’t traditionally pursued wireless keyboards.
But if the 60 percent keyboard trend keeps expanding, this feature will probably become more popular in the market by 2022 and beyond.


Check for full-size and tenkeyless (“TKL”) keyboards if going wireless right now is your primary priority.
There is a considerably wider variety available.

So, What Is the Best 60 or 65 Percent Keyboard to Buy?

It’s up to you to make your decision now that you know what to look for in a 60 or 65-percent keyboard.
Here is our ranking of the top little keyboards based on recent reviews. Additionally, if you’re crazy about competition, think about combining your new little keyboard with one of our favorite esports mice.

Anne Pro 2
  • CMYK PBT keycaps for mod keys and ESC.
  • The included USB-C cable is rubberized and is colored red for some reason.
Razer Huntsman Mini
  • RGB backlighting with individually-lit keys.
  • Programmable keys.
  • Low latency.
Royal Kludge RK61
  • Bluetooth capabilities.
  • The RK61 is compatible with Windows and Mac, and can even connect via Bluetooth to phones or tablets.
Kinesis TKO Gaming Keyboard
  • modular triple spacebar.
  • hotswap Kailh Box switches.
  • Doubleshot PBT keycaps.
  • dual-zone RGB lighting.
  • ergonomic tenting & tilting.
  • Limited Edition hard-shell travel case.
Corsair K70 Pro Mini Wireless
  • Hot-swappable printed circuit board (PCB).
  • Full RGB backlighting.
  • 8000Hz maximum polling rate with a wired connection.
  • Extremely low latency.
Asus ROG Falchion Wireless Gaming Keyboard
  • interactive touch panel and innovative two-way cover case.
  • it’s the first ROG keyboard with wireless Aura Sync RGB lighting.
  • Doubleshot keycaps and German-made Cherry MX RGB mechanical switches for precise, tactile keystrokes.
HyperX Alloy Origins 65
  • colored backlighting.
  • fast response time.
  • the tactile feedback.

Anne Pro 2

favored on Reddit.
If you want to get rid of the unsightly cords on your desk, the Anne Pro 2 is a reliable 60% keyboard that provides a wireless option.

I would steer clear of playing competitive games with it in wifi mode, fortunately, the wired option is input lag free. Unfortunately, the wireless mode isn’t input lag-free like it is with gaming controllers.

Despite its lack of connectivity, the Anne Pro 2 features sturdy construction, strong stabilizers, and a satisfying typing experience overall.

For the Anne Pro 2’s pricing point, the value is out of this world.

The Anne Pro 2’s software is much better than I had anticipated, enabling deep key mapping and layers that further customize the 60% layout to your preferences.

Pros

  • Fantastic software customization
  • Good stabs
  • Great switch options
  • Doubleshot PBT keycaps
  • Wireless connection option

Cons

  • Forgets backlight settings on power down in wireless mode
  • Weird one-sided USB-C cable
  • Wireless connectivity can be unreliable
  • RGB is dim and inconsistent

Razer Huntsman Mini

The Huntsman Mini, which costs about the same as the Ducky, includes software customization, PBT keycaps, and an excellent linear switch option.

Although I don’t believe the Huntsman gives a better typing/gaming experience than the Ducky One 2 Mini, it does provide a very competitive alternative with excellent customization choices through fully developed software.

It provides a good 60% gaming experience even though the keyboard is a little loud and light and the Linear switches are quick and smooth.

Pros

  • Good software customization options with Synapse
  • Attractive design
  • PBT keycaps with side printed legends for the second layer

Cons

  • Loud hollow sound, even louder with clicky switches
  • Lightweight
  • Can’t completely customize the second layer

Royal Kludge RK61 60% Keyboard

If you find a decent batch, the Royal Kludge RK61 is a wireless mechanical keyboard that punches much above its price point.

At $45 USD, the feature set is outstanding and includes double shot ABS keycaps with a USB-C connector in wired mode, multi-device Bluetooth wireless, 3 switch options, respectable stabilizers, and more.

Uncertainty is what you give up in exchange for this keyboard’s price; there is no clearly defined warranty, and many users appear to experience issues with batteries and RK61s that stop working altogether after a while.

If you’re feeling fortunate and manage to score a decent RK61 without any problems, it’ll seem like an incredible deal. If you’re not into gambling, spend a little more money on something like the Anne Pro if you need wireless.

Pros

  • Multi-device connectivity
  • Better than-expected stabilizers
  • 3 main switch options
  • Doubleshot ABS keycaps
  • Centered USB-C port

Cons

  • No secondary layer programming
  • Reported reliability issues
  • Ugly legends
  • Single-color backlit versions don’t have software

Kinesis TKO Gaming 60% Keyboard

There are several different styles of ergonomic keyboards, including 60 percent of designs geared toward esports.

One such little keyboard is the $175 Kinesis Gaming TKO, made by Kinesis, the company behind some of the greatest split keyboards on the market.

Although it doesn’t have as many ergonomic features as the Freestyle Edge RGB, it does include a few functions you wouldn’t typically see in a small keyboard.

Along with having a superb design and sturdy construction, these attributes enable the TKO to rise to the top of the heap of esports keyboards and earn Editors’ Choice status.

The TKO is a true 60 percent keyboard because it only has 63 keys.

The function row, utility keys, and arrows—keys that enthusiasts of full-size and tenkeyless (TKL) keyboards deem essential—are therefore absent.

Although the actual keys on this keyboard, like many others, are no longer present, their functionality can still be accessed by using an increased number of Function (Fn) key shortcuts.

Nearly every key has a secondary function in addition to media and onboard programming controls that you’ll probably want to be aware of.

Fortunately, the TKO extends a hand of friendship to new users by providing sidecap legends with icons for each key’s Fn combo.

Pros

  • Four ergonomic feet enable reverse tilt and tenting
  • Three-button spacebar
  • Nine onboard profiles
  • RGB underglow bar
  • Bundled carrying case

Cons

  • Configuration and firmware updates are more difficult than usual with driverless software.

Corsair K70 PRO MINI 60% Keyboard

The superb Corsair K70 RGB Pro, a full-size premium keyboard with some great RGB lighting and a tonne of top-tier gaming capabilities, was released by Corsair earlier this year.

Now, if you thought to yourself, “I wish 40% of the keyboard were gone,” when you first saw the K70 RGB Pro, Corsair has the keyboard for you.

The K70 RGB Pro Mini Wireless ($179.99) does away with the number pad and extra macros adds some strong wireless capabilities and packs everything into a small, tightly-packed frame while maintaining the same level of customizability as its larger cousin.

The only significant drawback is that, like its full-size relative, the 60% keyboard has a hefty price to match its strong feature set.

In essence, the K70 RGB Pro Mini is a little goliath.
It’s impressive how Corsair was able to fit nearly all of the functions of the full-size keyboard into just 61 keys when you take it out of the packaging.

There are really no missing features other than a volume roller, including media controls, Bluetooth and 2.4GHz connection switching, and even mouse cursor control (which most mini keyboards lack).
The Alt button is now just used to control volume.

Pros

  • Excellent RGB implementation
  • Hot-swappable key switches
  • Included key cap and key switch puller
  • Bluetooth and 2.4GHz connection options
  • Compact and lightweight
  • Can create up to 50 user profiles via Corsair iCue app

Cons

  • Expensive
  • An 8,000Hz polling maximum may be overkill

Asus ROG Falchion Wireless 60% Gaming Keyboard

With small 60- and 65-percent gaming keyboards gaining center stage, it was only a matter of time before a manufacturer started grafting quality-of-life features onto the typically austere design.

With its touch-based volume slider and opaque plastic case, the $159.99 Asus ROG Falchion 65 percent keyboard has a luxurious feel.

Additionally, mechanical keyboards with wireless capabilities are still rather uncommon.

The Falchion doesn’t have many features per se, but it offers a feature set that stands out among the new generation of tiny keyboards for 2021.

The Asus ROG Falchion is a small keyboard that Editors’ Choice recommends for this reason.

The 68-key Asus ROG Falchion is a tad on the large side for a compact keyboard, despite the fact that its extra features don’t add any visible extra surface area.

It is not particularly small or huge, but it is on the lengthy side for a compact design at 1.69 by 12.19 by 4.13 inches (HWD).

The number pad, function row, and certain editing keys are taken out of the Falchion to make it a 65 percent keyboard.

Pros

  • Wireless and mechanical
  • Compact 65 percent design
  • Touch-based volume slider
  • Incredible battery life
  • Dongle storage
  • Comes with a cover

Cons

  • The cover doesn’t attach to the keyboard
  • Armory Crate offloads some RGB customization to a second app
  • Battery indicator housed in the keyboard’s side

HyperX Alloy Origins 65

65 and 60 percent keyboards, which have long been the favorite option of many programmers, have more lately begun to catch the interest of gamers who want to free up desk space.

The goal is to reduce fat without sacrificing functionality, and several manufacturers have succeeded in doing so.

Top choices like the Corsair K70 RGB Pro Mini Wireless and the Razer Huntsman Mini Analog stand out from the competition, but they are by no means the only compact solutions available.

Let’s introduce the HyperX Alloy Origins 65, a 65 percent board with a light aluminum body, pleasing RGB lighting, and comfy HyperX key switches that make each keypress enjoyable.

And since it only costs $99, budget-conscious gamers are likely to love it.

I don’t mean it negatively when I say that the HyperX Alloy Origins 65 doesn’t stand out from the majority of tiny keyboards on the market.

HyperX’s 67-button layout is covered in a matte black finish that gives it a nice sheen.

Doubleshot PBT keycaps guard the keys against deterioration and include translucent text that allows the RGB lighting to shine through.

Due to the Alloy Origins 65’s reduced key count compared to a full-size keyboard, secondary functionalities and additional functions have been placed on the keycaps’ sides.

Pros

  • Excellent-feeling HyperX key switches
  • RGB lighting
  • Compact footprint
  • Included keycap puller
  • The Ngenuity app works well for customization

Cons

  • No wireless option

Buying guide for the Best 60% Keyboard for gaming

What is a 60 % keyboard?

A 60% keyboard has a substantially lower horizontal and vertical footprint since it eliminates all function keys, arrow keys, and the Numpad.

A 60% keyboard has a significantly smaller horizontal and vertical footprint because it does not have any arrow or function keys, nor does it include a Numpad.

The Pros and Cons of a 60% keyboard

Benefits of a 60% keyboard

The main advantage of 60% keyboards is their narrow width, which frees up more space for the mouse and generally results in a more comfortable gaming posture. Gamers can place their keyboard in the position that is most comfortable for them because of its reduced width.

60% keyboards are also excellent for those who have a small workspace and are easy to pack for trips.

The more symmetrical layout design of 60% of keyboards also makes me think they look pretty attractive.

Drawbacks of a 60% keyboard

If you frequently use the function or arrow keys, it will take some time for you to adjust to not having them right there. Keys that are not readily accessible on the surface can result in a slight loss in productivity.

It might be very difficult to hit those binds across a layer if you frequently use the Numpad or play games that heavily utilize the F keys or arrow cluster.

There are also fewer key mapping options when there are fewer total keys.

FAQs

Should I buy or build?

The building is a lot of fun, teaches you new skills, and lets you create the ideal keyboard. Nevertheless, it can take a while to complete, both in terms of waiting for the components and the actual assembly, and you’ll be held liable for any errors you make. There are helpful manuals on sites like /r/mechanicalkeyboards, Keyboard University, and Switch and Click if you’re interested.

Purchasing a barebones keyboard like the Glorious GMMK, where all you have to do is select and install switches and keycaps, can be a nice middle-ground option. This results in a keyboard that feels very personal to you while mainly avoiding the most difficult steps, such as soldering and waiting for your group purchase to arrive.

What do labels like 60 percent and 65 percent actually mean?

These categories are based on the actual amount of keys on the keyboard; since a full-size keyboard typically has 104 or 105 keys, a keyboard that is 60 percent full will have a few more keys, a keyboard that is 65 percent full will have a few extra keys, and so on.

  • Full-size: the most common layout that includes the alphanumerics and modifier keys, the function row, navigation, and arrow keys, and the Numpad.
  • TKL (tenkeyless): a full-size keyboard with all clusters and the same spacing, just with the Numpad removed.
  • 75 percent: about as many keys as a TKL, but each cluster is grouped together tightly to achieve a smaller footprint.
  • 65 percent: a keyboard with no function row, navigation keys, or Numpad, just alphanumerics, modifiers, and arrow keys.
  • 60 percent: a keyboard with just alphanumerics and modifiers.
  • 40 percent: no number row, but with extra modifiers and a smaller space bar to keep things (somewhat) usable.

The number of keys may vary between boards, sometimes noticeably, as layouts are far less standardized than on bigger form factors and they are simply broad labels.

TKL is fine, and 60 percent is usually doable, but less popular sizes like 65 percent and 75 percent might require you to mix and match keycaps from different sets or just accept the keycaps that the board came with. This also means that finding replacement keycaps for smaller keyboards can be challenging.

Why are mechanical keyboards so expensive?

The majority of mechanical keyboards from well-known gaming companies cost approximately £100.
Users appear to be willing to pay this price point for a better typing experience, and it allows manufacturers to recuperate the cost of creating advanced functions as well as the cost of integrating numerous (quite expensive!) mechanical switches.


Fortunately, you can find keyboards for half that cost, but you’ll have to do without a well-known brand and the features that frequently come with it.

No matter how much you spend, buying a mechanical keyboard should at least be considered an investment rather than a one-time purchase. If cared for properly, a mechanical keyboard should last for decades.

Should I Get a Wireless 60 Percent Keyboard?

A detachable cable, preferably USB-C, is included on between 60 and 65 percent of keyboards, making transportation and storage simpler. Companies occasionally still include proprietary locking mechanisms in the cables to prevent the cable from coming undone while being used.
I prefer it when businesses avoid using such tactics.


Except in extreme cases, the cables stay in place just well on their own, and since there is no locking mechanism, any other USB Type-C to A cable can be used to replace a broken one.

What about portable wireless keyboards?

After all, if you’re looking to clear up desk space, you may as well remove the connection, too. Wireless 60 and 65 percent keyboards are available, but they are uncommon. Competitive gamers, programmers, and fans of custom keyboards—the groups who have usually shown the greatest interest in 60 and 65 percent keyboards—haven’t traditionally pursued wireless keyboards.


But if the 60 percent keyboard trend keeps expanding, this feature will probably become more popular in the market by 2022 and beyond. Check for full-size and tenkeyless (“TKL”) keyboards if going wireless right now is your primary priority. There is a considerably wider variety available.

Final Word

It’s up to you to make your decision now that you know what to look for in a 60 or 65 percent keyboard.
Here is our ranking of the top little keyboards based on recent reviews. Additionally, if you’re crazy about competition, think about combining your new little keyboard with one of our favorite esports mice.

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